What Estate Planning Do I Need with a New Baby?

Congratulations parent! You have a new baby. There’s a lot to think about, but there is a vital task that should be a priority. That is making an estate plan. People usually don’t worry about estate planning when they’re young, healthy and starting a new family. However, your new baby is depending on you to make decisions that will set them up for a secure future.

Motley Fool’s recent article, “If You’re a New Parent, Take These 4 Estate Planning Steps” says there are a few key estate planning steps that every parent should take to make certain they’ve protected their child, no matter what the future holds.

  1. Purchase Life Insurance. If a parent dies, life insurance will make sure there are funds available for the other spouse to keep providing for the children. If both parents die, life insurance can be used for a guardian to raise the child or to fund the cost of college. For most parents, term life insurance is used because the premiums are affordable, and the coverage will be in effect long enough for your child to grow to an adult.
  2. Draft a Will and Name a Guardian for your Children. For parents, the most important reason to make a will is to name a guardian for your children. If you designate a guardian, you can select the person that you think shares your values and who will do a good job raising your children. This way, it’s not left to a judge to make that selection. Do this as soon as your children are born.
  3. Update Beneficiaries. Your will should say what happens to most of your assets, but you probably have some accounts with a designated beneficiary, like a 401(k), IRA, or life insurance. When you have children, you’ll need to update the beneficiaries on these accounts for your children to inherit these assets as secondary beneficiaries, so they will inherit them in the event of your and your spouse’s death. Be careful, however, to designate a custodian to take care of those funds while your children are still minors.
  4. Look at a Trust. If you die prior to your children turning 18, they can’t directly take control of any inheritance you leave for them. This means that a judge may need to appoint someone to manage assets that you leave to your child. Your child could also wind up inheriting a lot of money and property free and clear at age 18. To have more control, like who will manage assets, how your money and property should be used for your children and when your children should directly receive a transfer of wealth, ask your estate planning attorney about creating a trust. With a trust, you can designate an individual who will manage money on behalf of your children and provide instructions for how the trustee can use the money to help care for your children, as they age. You can also create conditions on your children receiving a direct transfer of assets, such as requiring your children to reach age 21 or requiring them to use the money to cover college costs. Trusts are for anyone who wants more control over how their property will help their children after they’ve passed away.

When you have a new baby, working on your estate planning probably isn’t a big priority. However, it’s worth taking the time to talk to an attorney for the security of knowing your bundle of joy can still be provided for, in the event that the worst happens to you.

Reference: Motley Fool (September 28, 2019) “If You’re a New Parent, Take These 4 Estate Planning Steps”

Beginning-of-Year Financial Tasks

There are some tasks that, if left undone, can have an enormous impact on those you love. The beginning of the year is a good time to set some deadlines for yourself, while you still have New Years resolution momentum. Give yourself a February 15 deadline, and you’ll stay focused says The Daily Journal’s article “5 financial tasks you should tackle by year-end.”

Here’s the list to get you started:

Check Your Beneficiaries on All Accounts. A sad story comes from Washington state, where a man died two months after his divorce was finalized. He had not changed his beneficiaries, so all of his life insurance proceeds and his pension plan went to his ex-wife, and not to his children from a prior marriage. The case went through the court system all the way up to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled in 2001 that the beneficiary designations had to be honored.

Start by making a list of your accounts, then check to see who your beneficiaries are. You may need to contact the financial custodian of the accounts, or you might be able to do it online. Ask for confirmation in all cases, so you and your heirs will have it in writing. Keep this in an organized binder so it will be easy to find if something were to happen to you.

Look at Any Pay-On-Death Designations. In some accounts, there is a pay-on-death designation, in place of a beneficiary designation. This also may have been an option that you chose when you first opened the account. Without a designation or Pay-On-Death name, the account must go through probate, the legal procedure to distribute property in your estate.

Depending on the state, you might have had this option on the property or even vehicles. A local estate planning attorney will know if this is an option in your state. To add or change a beneficiary on a vehicle, you’ll need to apply for a certificate of car ownership with the beneficiary form. If you want to change your deed to a Transfer-on-Death deed, you will need to submit a new deed to the appropriate county recorder. Again, an estate planning attorney will be able to help. The lawyer will also help evaluate whether this is a good way to transfer property in your situation.

Update Insurance Policies. The insurance company is not going to send a beneficiary a check without someone filing a claim. The family often does not know what insurance policies exist. A 2013 investigation from Consumer Reports found nearly $1 billion in unclaimed life insurance proceeds. You want to update your contact information with the insurer every now and then, making sure that your beneficiaries are correct and that bills are being sent to the right address. In some cases, the insurance company allows people to notify another person if payment is overdue and they are not able to reach you. You should also keep that contact information updated, in case your back-up person moves. Keep a list of your insurance policies in a place easy to find.

What’s In Your Safe Deposit Box? If it’s been a while since you’ve visited your safe deposit box, schedule a time to go and have a look. If you neglect to pay your annual fee, after a number of years the bank is legally permitted to open the box and turn its contents over to the state. Visit once a year to make sure payments and contact details are current. Leave clear instructions with your executor and heirs about where to find the box and its keys. Consider giving another family member official access to the box.

Revise Powers of Attorney. Now is a good time to review your powers of attorney to see if it’s time for an update. If you can’t locate your original POA documents, or if the people you chose many years ago have died or moved away, it’s time for a new set. And if you don’t have power of attorney documents in place, make an appointment with your estate planning lawyer to have them created. Spare your family the stress, lost time, and unnecessary expenses that trying to get access to your accounts might cause by having these updated and name a backup agent (or two).

Yes, technically this article was for the end of the year, but we are a long way from the end of 2020 and I have a feeling that these tasks weren’t on any of your holiday ‘to-dos’ or end of year lists.  Heck, even if you did set yourself a deadline to complete these tasks before the end of the year that would be fantastic.

Reference: The Daily Journal (Nov. 18, 2019) “5 financial tasks you should tackle by year-end”

What Will New Acts of Congress Mean for Stretch IRAs?

The SECURE and RESA acts are currently being considered in Congress. These acts may impact stretch IRAs. A stretch IRA is an estate planning strategy that extends the tax-deferred condition of an inherited IRA when it is passed to a non-spouse beneficiary. This strategy lets the account continue its tax-deferred growth over a long period of time.

Congress is considering legislation with the SECURE and RESA Acts, that would eliminate the ability of children to create a stretch IRA, one that would let them to stretch distributions from the inherited IRA over their lifetimes. The proposed SECURE and RESA Acts under consideration state that the maximum deferral period will be 10 years. If the beneficiary is a minor, the period would be 10 years or age 21.

If Congress does pass the SECURE and RESA acts, people will need to change the way they financially plan for their retirement accounts. If a parent doesn’t need to spend any of her Required Minimum Distributions, does it make sense to do a gradual Roth IRA conversion and use the RMDs to pay taxes on the conversion? Or should the parent invest the RMDs in a brokerage account?

There are several options in this situation, according to nj.com’s recent article, “With Stretch IRAs on the way out, how can I plan for my children’s inheritance?”

As with many things related to financial and estate planning, the best planning strategy for a parent would depend on her overall finances and what she wants for her children’s inheritance.

The conversion to a Roth may be a good planning move if the parent’s tax bracket makes the income tax rate reasonable. Putting the money in a brokerage account is also an option.

A parent may also want to think about using the RMD proceeds to purchase a life insurance policy held by an irrevocable trust for the benefit of her children.

It’s best to contact an experienced estate planning attorney, so he or she can review the details of the parent’s finances and help her choose the best options for her situation.

Reference: nj.com (October 15, 2019) “With Stretch IRAs on the way out, how can I plan for my children’s inheritance?”

The Biggest Estate Planning Errors

The Biggest Estate Planning Errors
Young woman making a mistake on a pink background

Nobody likes to plan for events like aging, incapacity, or death. However, failing to do so can cause families burdens and grief, thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours. Fox Business’ recent article, “Here are the top estate planning mistakes to avoid,” says that planning for life’s unexpected events is critical. However, it can often be a hard process to navigate. Let’s look at the top estate planning mistakes to avoid, according to industry experts:

1. Failing to have a will (or one that can be located). The biggest mistake is simply not having a will. Many people wait for “a more appropriate time” to put a will together. The truth is, we all need estate planning, no matter the amount of assets a person may have. In addition to having a will prepared and executed, it needs to be findable. The Wall Street Journal says that the biggest estate planning error is simply losing a will. Make sure your family has access to any estate planning documents you create.

2. Failing to name and update beneficiaries. An asset with a beneficiary designation supersedes any terms in a will. Review your 401(k), IRA, life insurance, and any other accounts with beneficiaries after any significant life event. If you don’t have the proper beneficiary designations, income tax on retirement accounts may have to be paid sooner and your heirs will have to pay a lump sum tax immediately. Without a life insurance policy, the proceeds will have to go through probate, which means they are subject to creditors’ claims.

Another mistake that impacts people with minor children is naming a guardian for minor children and then naming the guardian as the outright beneficiary of their life insurance. If money is left to the guardian, then the proceeds are now considered the assets of the guardian and do not transfer to the minors. The cash also now faces exposure to the creditors and spouse of the guardian named as a beneficiary Instead, parents should leave the money to a trust for the children and name the guardian, or another trusted and responsible person, as the trustee of the trust.

3. Failing to consider powers of attorney for adult children. When your children reach age 18, they’re adults in the eyes of the law. If something unfortunate happens to them, you may be left without any say in their treatment or even access to their medical records. In the event that an 18-year-old becomes ill or has an accident, a hospital won’t consult with their parents if a power of attorney for health care isn’t in place. Further, without a financial power of attorney, a parent may not be able to take care of bills, make investment decisions or pay taxes without the child’s signature. This could create an issue when your child is in college—especially if he or she is attending school abroad. It is very important that when your child turns 18 that you have powers of attorney put into place.

Reference: Fox Business (October 15, 2019) “Here are the top estate planning mistakes to avoid”

How Can Life Insurance Help Me with my Post-Divorce Estate Planning?

How Can Life Insurance Help Me with my Post-Divorce Estate Planning?
Agent protects family figures. Life Insurance policy on a desk.

Divorce can be extremely stressful in and of itself as you work through you and your ex-spouse’s current financial landscape. To add insult to injury, divorce can bring some extra challenges to estate planning. The good news is that there are some easy solutions that can help. In many instances, a frequently overlooked strategy can provide real solutions for divorcees as they go through a divorce, as well as provide for future blended families. That’s life insurance. Using life insurance to address some of these issues, can help you create an estate plan that really fits your needs, goals and unique family circumstances.

Insurance News Net’s article “5 Ways Life Insurance Eases Post-Divorce Estate Planning” provides us with five ways life insurance can help you in the event of a divorce:

Have money for divorce-related expenses. If the divorce is contested or includes child custody issues, the proceedings be quite long, maybe months or years. As a result, your attorney’s fees could be hefty. Those with an established permanent life insurance policy can take withdrawals or loans from the policy’s cash value to help pay expenses. If the policy is designed effectively, you won’t have to liquidate other assets or take money from your estate that was designated for beneficiaries.

Protect your income post-divorce. Your income can change significantly after a divorce, especially if one spouse was a stay-at-home parent. They may get alimony payments to help make up the difference, but if the payor unexpectedly dies, the lost income can create a lot of stress and financial hardship for those left behind. Permanent life insurance on the paying spouse can help provide coverage and replace any income lost in the event they pass away suddenly.

Preserve your estate post-divorce. Life insurance can also provide funds to pay off existing debt held by the deceased ex-spouse, which may otherwise eat through the estate. This also can eliminate the need to liquidate other assets from the estate that would have gone to the surviving spouse or other heirs. Take withdrawals or loans from the policy–tax-free, if the policy is set up correctly–and you can effectively plan your legacy, even if your ex-spouse hasn’t been financially responsible.

Ensure that children get a fair inheritance. If you have children from a previous marriage, it may make sense to provide for them through life insurance, rather than passing their assets through a new spouse first. In the alternative, you can provide for your new spouse through life insurance and leave the estate to the children outright or in a trust. With either option, dividing how you leave assets to biological children and a new spouse in a blended family can eliminate stress and bad feelings, especially if the new spouse has children of their own.

Help fund college or other expenses for your children. There is a lot of value in getting life insurance on the lives of both parents, even if only one of them previously worked. Protecting the lives of both parents with permanent life insurance allows you to make certain that the expenses for the children are addressed. Therefore, if the former spouse is responsible for paying medical expenses, college expenses, or other costs for the children, life insurance can provide needed funds if that ex-spouse passes. Permanent life insurance with cash value can also provide funds during the insured spouse’s lifetime (if cash isn’t readily available) to pay college tuition or help adult children repay student loan debt.

You should also look at permanent instead of term insurance. Term insurance may be less expensive, but permanent insurance can accumulate cash value that can be drawn from the policy while the spouse is still alive, as well as providing a death benefit. You may want to also look into adding riders to customize your policy. With a permanent life insurance policy and a long-term care rider, you have the ability to accelerate the policy’s benefit while you’re alive to pay for long-term care costs. This can put to rest some of the concerns for divorcees about who will take care of them if they can’t take care of themselves.

A carefully planned permanent life insurance policy can help you protect yourself, your income, and your estate throughout your lifetime, even if you experience divorce.

Reference: Insurance News Net (November 5, 2019) “5 Ways Life Insurance Eases Post-Divorce Estate Planning”

‘Bye Bye Love’ Rocker Ric Ocasek Cuts Wife Out of Will

In a world where many stars have their estates dragged through the probate court, it can be a relief to see a celebrity use estate planning documents to accomplish their post-death goals. One example is Ric Ocasek.

The language in the will was very clear, according to the article “Cars singer Ric Ocasek cuts supermodel wife Paulina Porizkova out of will” from Page Six. There was no provision for his wife Paulina since they were in the process of divorcing. He added that even if he died before their divorce was finalized, she was not to receive any elective share “… because she has abandoned me.” This highlights the fact that Ocasek thought through different possibilities, and the lack of ambiguity makes it easier for a court to administer the will.

It was Porizkova who found Ocasek’s body in September while bringing him coffee as he recovered from recent surgery. The couple had two sons together and had called it quits in May 2018, after being married for 28 years. They met on set during the making of the music video for the Cars’ song “Drive.”

A filing with Ocasek’s will stated that his assets included $5 million in copyrights, but only $100,000 in tangible personal property and $15,000 in cash. The document did not detail the copyright assets.

That may seem like a small estate for someone with Ocasek’s fame. However, an attorney who examined the document told The New York Post that it was likely the Cars’ frontman probably had more assets protected through trusts, yet another indication that Ocasek was very intentional about his estate plan.

Like other high-profile performers who have considerable assets and who are savvy about finances, it’s possible that he has many more millions of dollars. Thanks to proper planning, however, they will not pass through probate and will be protected from the public view and scrutiny. That is why people use trusts, especially when they are public figures.

The Cars’ singer also seems to have left two of his six sons out of the will. The children he had with Porizkova were not left out of the will. Even though this may seem harsh, it’s possible that the sons who were left out of the will were compensated through other means. There may have been trusts set up for them, or life insurance proceeds.

The document indicates that the will was signed on August 28, less than a month before his death.

Ocasek died of heart disease on September 15. At the time, he also suffered from pulmonary emphysema. Mario Testani, his friend, and business manager is named as the executor.

The advance planning done in Ocasek’s estate is a lesson in how trusts and other estate planning methods can be used to maintain an individual’s privacy, even if some of their other assets pass through a will.

Reference: Page Six (Nov. 7, 2019) “Cars singer Ric Ocasek cuts supermodel wife Paulina Porizkova out of will”

Find Money in Forgotten Accounts

Many people who retire find it hard to live on a reduced income, so any windfall is a delight. Bank accounts, life insurance, utility company security deposits, and retirement accounts are all places you might have anywhere from a few bucks to hundreds or thousands of dollars sitting around gathering dust. The trick is to know where to look, since you might not remember all the possible companies that still have some of your money. Here are some tips for seniors on how to find money in forgotten accounts.

Where to Look for Old Bank or Investment Accounts

If you had money in a bank or brokerage account you did not use for several years, the bank probably sent the funds to the state of your last known address. Your last known address usually means the last address the bank had for you, when you actively banked with them.

Let’s say you went to college out of state. You opened a checking account at a local bank for convenience while in school. After graduation, you forgot about the account. Eventually, the bank will send the remaining balance to that state or the state from the permanent address you gave when you opened the account.

You can try to track down obsolete accounts online. Go to unclaimed.org and check every state where you have lived. If you do find something, you will have to fill out and send in a form, either online or by mail, to request the funds. The website contains funds that other types of companies, like utilities, have also surrendered to the state.

This type of search can be time-consuming, but the rewards can make your efforts worthwhile. If you have ever gone by another name, be sure to check under all the names you have used. If you use a nickname, check under all possible combinations of last names, legal first name and nickname.

If your name is a common name, you might have to sift through many possible accounts to find yours. You might also be surprised at how many other people have the same name as you.

Pensions and Retirement Accounts

You have several options to try to dig up an old employer-sponsored retirement account, including pensions. You need to find the current administrator of that employer’s plan. You might be able to find the contact information for the plan administrator on freeERISA.com or by calling the personnel office of that employer.

Sometimes a 401(k) plan gets terminated. In that situation, you can look for contact information on the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s website. Additional options include the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, or the nonprofit Pension Rights Center.

How to Search for Life Insurance Policies

You can look for an old life insurance policy you owned, or that of a deceased relative, by using the Life Insurance Policy Locator. Some life insurance policies show up on unclaimed.org, but for others, you might have to find the name of the insurance company at naic.org and then contact the insurer.

Scammer Alert

Be aware before you hire someone to help with finding hidden money. Some companies defrauded people by charging exorbitant fees to conduct searches for them, but do not deliver the promised service. If a company charges a fee upfront before they find your lost funds, that is a red flag the firm is fraudulent. If you want someone else to do the search for you, only agree to pay a percentage of the money that is actually recovered. The search firm’s cut should not exceed 10 to 20 percent of the recovered funds.

References:

AARP. “How to Find “Forgotten” Cash.” (accessed October 2, 2019) https://www.aarp.org/money/budgeting-saving/info-2019/find-unclaimed-cash.html

Am I Too Young to Think About Estate Planning?

It’s wise for younger generations to consider estate planning early, advises The Cleveland Jewish News in the recent article “Younger generations should focus on estate planning, too.” Don’t be fooled into thinking that an estate plan is only for older people or the ultra-wealthy. In fact, there are many younger adults who may need it, especially if they have been financially successful and also have experienced changes with marriage and families.

This is especially important for young people who are in committed relationships. A young married couple should talk together about their vision and goals for their financial, health, and legal affairs, in case something happens to one of them or within their families.

Estate plans provide some certainty in an otherwise uncertain life. There are many reasons to start early. One reason is that you never know what’s going to happen. You want to make certain that all of your assets are in place.

When creating an estate plan, there are a few things that younger people should consider, such as making sure all their accounts have named a beneficiary. This includes life insurance, retirement, and checking and savings accounts. These beneficiaries need to be reviewed on an ongoing basis and updated for life and family changes.

Many younger adults will be fine with just a will, a financial power of attorney, and a health care power of attorney. However, marriage is a time when people begin to have more complexity in their professional lives. This can include starting a business or becoming leaders at companies and that may require more complex and protective plans.

While younger generations are known to be independent and to try to meet all their needs online, estate plans should be treated differently. There are numerous online tools or ‘do-it-yourself’ strategies, but professional legal assistance can make it an easier and a more thorough process. Remember, when you meet with an attorney, you are not just getting the papers; you are also receiving their guidance and expertise, crafted to address the needs of your specific situation.

Start as early as you can and set the foundation for more complex planning that will come in the future. This preparation will mean less stress for those left behind after you pass away.

Reference: Cleveland Jewish News (September 19, 2019) “Younger generations should focus on estate planning, too”

What Happens When There’s No Will or the Will Is Invalid?

The Queen of Soul’s lack of a properly executed estate plan isn’t the first time a celebrity died without a will, and it surely will not be the last says The Bulletin in the article “Aretha Franklin and other celebrities died without an estate plan. Will you?”

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Howard Hughes, and Prince all died without a valid will and estate plan. When actor Heath Ledger died, his will left everything to his parents and three sisters. The will had been written before his daughter was born and left nothing to his daughter or her mother (it should be noted that if Ledger lived in California he would have needed a trust to avoid probate). Ledger’s family later gave all the money from the estate to his daughter.

Getting started on a will is not that challenging if you work with an experienced estate planning attorney. They often start clients out with a simple information gathering form, sometimes in an online process or on paper. They’ll ask a lot of questions, like if you have life insurance, a prenup, who you want to be your executor and who should be the guardian of your children.

Don’t overlook your online presence. If you die without a plan for your digital assets, you have a problem known as “cyber intestacy.” Plan for who will be able to access and manage your social media, online properties, etc., in addition to your tangible assets, like investment accounts and real property.

Automatic bill payments and electronic bank withdrawals continue after death, and heirs may struggle to access photographs and email. When including digital estate plans in your will, provide a name for the person who should have access to your online accounts. Check with your estate planning attorney to see if they are familiar with digital assets. Do a complete inventory, including frequent flyer miles, PayPal and other accounts.

Remember that if you don’t make a will or trust, the state where you live has laws that will decide for you. Each state has different statutes determining who gets your assets. They may not be the people you wanted, so that’s another reason why you need to have a will or trust.

Life insurance policies, IRAs, and other accounts that have beneficiaries are handled separately from the will. Beneficiaries receive assets directly and that bypasses anything written in a will, so you should confirm and keep documentation that specifies who your beneficiaries are. This is especially important for unmarried millennials, Gen Xers, divorced people, single individuals, and widows and widowers, who may not have designated someone as a beneficiary.

Don’t forget your pets. Your heirs may not want your furry family members, and they could end up in a shelter and euthanized if there’s no plan for them. You can sign a “pet protection” agreement or set up a pre-funded pet trust. Some states allow them; others do not. Your estate planning attorney will be able to help protect your beloved pets as well as your family.

Reference: The Bulletin (Sep. 14, 2019) “Aretha Franklin and other celebrities died without an estate plan. Will you?”

What Do I Need to Do Financially, When We Have a Baby?

In addition to all the logistics involved with a new baby, new parents should also take care of financial and legal matters in the months leading up to the big day.

U.S. News & World Report’s recent article, “Financial Steps to Take When You’re Pregnant” reminds us that pregnancy is a terrific time to review your financial life. It’s a great time to assess your budget, emergency savings, estate planning documents, and insurance needs to see if anything needs to be refreshed.

Here are a few things to do to prepare for a new baby:

Employee Benefits. Take a look at your employee benefits or have a conversation with HR to determine how much time you can take off and whether you’ll be paid your salary while on parental leave. This is important because many families are faced with higher living costs by the presence of a new baby, which is often combined with taking parental leave that may cut their take-home pay. New parents may have to use the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), which offers eligible employees 12 weeks of unpaid leave, or tap into short-term disability insurance, which typically only replaces a portion of your salary. The amount you receive in short-term disability will also be impacted by whether you pay premiums with pre-tax or post-tax dollars. If you pay with pretax, your benefit will be subject to taxes, which will decrease the overall amount received.

While reviewing these policies, look at your health insurance and see what kind of prenatal visits and pediatric care are covered. You should also look at the terms of your health insurance policy since you could be liable for health insurance premiums during periods where you are taking leave from work. Also, remember that you’ll need to add your baby to your medical insurance within 30 days of the birth.

Budget. Create a new budget that takes into account changes in your income from taking leave and new expenses from having a new baby. You may have to survive several weeks without your normal level of income, so be sure that you have enough saved up to get through that period. After that, create another budget that considers more long-term expenses associated with the new one, such as the cost of childcare, diapers, and formula, all of which can add up.

Life Insurance. Determine if your current life insurance will meet your needs. If you need more, look at term life insurance. It’s usually affordable and expires after a set term, typically anywhere from 10 to 30 years. This policy payout would help a surviving parent or guardian care for your child.

Estate Planning. Consider who would care for your child if both parents were to die before they turn 18. Talk to family or close friends about who you’d like as the guardian of the child. Talk to an estate planning attorney to update (or create) a will and guardianship choices. In addition, ask about formulating a plan for how inheritance, insurance, and other assets will be handled and disbursed if you die while the child is a minor. A revocable living trust can be one way to direct a future inheritance. You can designate your child as the beneficiary and a relative or close friend as the trustee. The trustee will help decide how the money is spent. This trust is usually included in the will and activates after the death of the person who created it.

Beneficiary Designations. Update any beneficiary designations on your retirement and insurance accounts to include your child, but make sure and ask about meeting requirements for how minors can own property.

529 College Savings Account. You should also look into funding a 529 college savings account but don’t feel pressure to contribute a lot. Making certain that your budget, estate, and insurance needs are tailored to meet your new family dynamic are more pressing concerns.

Reference: U.S. News & World Report (August 29, 2019) “Financial Steps to Take When You’re Pregnant”