Find Money in Forgotten Accounts

Many people who retire find it hard to live on a reduced income, so any windfall is a delight. Bank accounts, life insurance, utility company security deposits, and retirement accounts are all places you might have anywhere from a few bucks to hundreds or thousands of dollars sitting around gathering dust. The trick is to know where to look, since you might not remember all the possible companies that still have some of your money. Here are some tips for seniors on how to find money in forgotten accounts.

Where to Look for Old Bank or Investment Accounts

If you had money in a bank or brokerage account you did not use for several years, the bank probably sent the funds to the state of your last known address. Your last known address usually means the last address the bank had for you, when you actively banked with them.

Let’s say you went to college out of state. You opened a checking account at a local bank for convenience while in school. After graduation, you forgot about the account. Eventually, the bank will send the remaining balance to that state or the state from the permanent address you gave when you opened the account.

You can try to track down obsolete accounts online. Go to unclaimed.org and check every state where you have lived. If you do find something, you will have to fill out and send in a form, either online or by mail, to request the funds. The website contains funds that other types of companies, like utilities, have also surrendered to the state.

This type of search can be time-consuming, but the rewards can make your efforts worthwhile. If you have ever gone by another name, be sure to check under all the names you have used. If you use a nickname, check under all possible combinations of last names, legal first name and nickname.

If your name is a common name, you might have to sift through many possible accounts to find yours. You might also be surprised at how many other people have the same name as you.

Pensions and Retirement Accounts

You have several options to try to dig up an old employer-sponsored retirement account, including pensions. You need to find the current administrator of that employer’s plan. You might be able to find the contact information for the plan administrator on freeERISA.com or by calling the personnel office of that employer.

Sometimes a 401(k) plan gets terminated. In that situation, you can look for contact information on the Employee Benefits Security Administration’s website. Additional options include the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, or the nonprofit Pension Rights Center.

How to Search for Life Insurance Policies

You can look for an old life insurance policy you owned, or that of a deceased relative, by using the Life Insurance Policy Locator. Some life insurance policies show up on unclaimed.org, but for others, you might have to find the name of the insurance company at naic.org and then contact the insurer.

Scammer Alert

Be aware before you hire someone to help with finding hidden money. Some companies defrauded people by charging exorbitant fees to conduct searches for them, but do not deliver the promised service. If a company charges a fee upfront before they find your lost funds, that is a red flag the firm is fraudulent. If you want someone else to do the search for you, only agree to pay a percentage of the money that is actually recovered. The search firm’s cut should not exceed 10 to 20 percent of the recovered funds.

References:

AARP. “How to Find “Forgotten” Cash.” (accessed October 2, 2019) https://www.aarp.org/money/budgeting-saving/info-2019/find-unclaimed-cash.html

Am I Too Young to Think About Estate Planning?

It’s wise for younger generations to consider estate planning early, advises The Cleveland Jewish News in the recent article “Younger generations should focus on estate planning, too.” Don’t be fooled into thinking that an estate plan is only for older people or the ultra-wealthy. In fact, there are many younger adults who may need it, especially if they have been financially successful and also have experienced changes with marriage and families.

This is especially important for young people who are in committed relationships. A young married couple should talk together about their vision and goals for their financial, health, and legal affairs, in case something happens to one of them or within their families.

Estate plans provide some certainty in an otherwise uncertain life. There are many reasons to start early. One reason is that you never know what’s going to happen. You want to make certain that all of your assets are in place.

When creating an estate plan, there are a few things that younger people should consider, such as making sure all their accounts have named a beneficiary. This includes life insurance, retirement, and checking and savings accounts. These beneficiaries need to be reviewed on an ongoing basis and updated for life and family changes.

Many younger adults will be fine with just a will, a financial power of attorney, and a health care power of attorney. However, marriage is a time when people begin to have more complexity in their professional lives. This can include starting a business or becoming leaders at companies and that may require more complex and protective plans.

While younger generations are known to be independent and to try to meet all their needs online, estate plans should be treated differently. There are numerous online tools or ‘do-it-yourself’ strategies, but professional legal assistance can make it an easier and a more thorough process. Remember, when you meet with an attorney, you are not just getting the papers; you are also receiving their guidance and expertise, crafted to address the needs of your specific situation.

Start as early as you can and set the foundation for more complex planning that will come in the future. This preparation will mean less stress for those left behind after you pass away.

Reference: Cleveland Jewish News (September 19, 2019) “Younger generations should focus on estate planning, too”

What Happens When There’s No Will or the Will Is Invalid?

The Queen of Soul’s lack of a properly executed estate plan isn’t the first time a celebrity died without a will, and it surely will not be the last says The Bulletin in the article “Aretha Franklin and other celebrities died without an estate plan. Will you?”

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Howard Hughes, and Prince all died without a valid will and estate plan. When actor Heath Ledger died, his will left everything to his parents and three sisters. The will had been written before his daughter was born and left nothing to his daughter or her mother (it should be noted that if Ledger lived in California he would have needed a trust to avoid probate). Ledger’s family later gave all the money from the estate to his daughter.

Getting started on a will is not that challenging if you work with an experienced estate planning attorney. They often start clients out with a simple information gathering form, sometimes in an online process or on paper. They’ll ask a lot of questions, like if you have life insurance, a prenup, who you want to be your executor and who should be the guardian of your children.

Don’t overlook your online presence. If you die without a plan for your digital assets, you have a problem known as “cyber intestacy.” Plan for who will be able to access and manage your social media, online properties, etc., in addition to your tangible assets, like investment accounts and real property.

Automatic bill payments and electronic bank withdrawals continue after death, and heirs may struggle to access photographs and email. When including digital estate plans in your will, provide a name for the person who should have access to your online accounts. Check with your estate planning attorney to see if they are familiar with digital assets. Do a complete inventory, including frequent flyer miles, PayPal and other accounts.

Remember that if you don’t make a will or trust, the state where you live has laws that will decide for you. Each state has different statutes determining who gets your assets. They may not be the people you wanted, so that’s another reason why you need to have a will or trust.

Life insurance policies, IRAs, and other accounts that have beneficiaries are handled separately from the will. Beneficiaries receive assets directly and that bypasses anything written in a will, so you should confirm and keep documentation that specifies who your beneficiaries are. This is especially important for unmarried millennials, Gen Xers, divorced people, single individuals, and widows and widowers, who may not have designated someone as a beneficiary.

Don’t forget your pets. Your heirs may not want your furry family members, and they could end up in a shelter and euthanized if there’s no plan for them. You can sign a “pet protection” agreement or set up a pre-funded pet trust. Some states allow them; others do not. Your estate planning attorney will be able to help protect your beloved pets as well as your family.

Reference: The Bulletin (Sep. 14, 2019) “Aretha Franklin and other celebrities died without an estate plan. Will you?”

What Do I Need to Do Financially, When We Have a Baby?

In addition to all the logistics involved with a new baby, new parents should also take care of financial and legal matters in the months leading up to the big day.

U.S. News & World Report’s recent article, “Financial Steps to Take When You’re Pregnant” reminds us that pregnancy is a terrific time to review your financial life. It’s a great time to assess your budget, emergency savings, estate planning documents, and insurance needs to see if anything needs to be refreshed.

Here are a few things to do to prepare for a new baby:

Employee Benefits. Take a look at your employee benefits or have a conversation with HR to determine how much time you can take off and whether you’ll be paid your salary while on parental leave. This is important because many families are faced with higher living costs by the presence of a new baby, which is often combined with taking parental leave that may cut their take-home pay. New parents may have to use the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), which offers eligible employees 12 weeks of unpaid leave, or tap into short-term disability insurance, which typically only replaces a portion of your salary. The amount you receive in short-term disability will also be impacted by whether you pay premiums with pre-tax or post-tax dollars. If you pay with pretax, your benefit will be subject to taxes, which will decrease the overall amount received.

While reviewing these policies, look at your health insurance and see what kind of prenatal visits and pediatric care are covered. You should also look at the terms of your health insurance policy since you could be liable for health insurance premiums during periods where you are taking leave from work. Also, remember that you’ll need to add your baby to your medical insurance within 30 days of the birth.

Budget. Create a new budget that takes into account changes in your income from taking leave and new expenses from having a new baby. You may have to survive several weeks without your normal level of income, so be sure that you have enough saved up to get through that period. After that, create another budget that considers more long-term expenses associated with the new one, such as the cost of childcare, diapers, and formula, all of which can add up.

Life Insurance. Determine if your current life insurance will meet your needs. If you need more, look at term life insurance. It’s usually affordable and expires after a set term, typically anywhere from 10 to 30 years. This policy payout would help a surviving parent or guardian care for your child.

Estate Planning. Consider who would care for your child if both parents were to die before they turn 18. Talk to family or close friends about who you’d like as the guardian of the child. Talk to an estate planning attorney to update (or create) a will and guardianship choices. In addition, ask about formulating a plan for how inheritance, insurance, and other assets will be handled and disbursed if you die while the child is a minor. A revocable living trust can be one way to direct a future inheritance. You can designate your child as the beneficiary and a relative or close friend as the trustee. The trustee will help decide how the money is spent. This trust is usually included in the will and activates after the death of the person who created it.

Beneficiary Designations. Update any beneficiary designations on your retirement and insurance accounts to include your child, but make sure and ask about meeting requirements for how minors can own property.

529 College Savings Account. You should also look into funding a 529 college savings account but don’t feel pressure to contribute a lot. Making certain that your budget, estate, and insurance needs are tailored to meet your new family dynamic are more pressing concerns.

Reference: U.S. News & World Report (August 29, 2019) “Financial Steps to Take When You’re Pregnant”

Why Estate Planning is Essential for Small Business Owners

For the entrepreneurial-minded person, nothing beats the excitement of having a vision for a business and then making that dream come true. However, have you ever wondered what will happen to that business after you are gone?

A comprehensive estate plan says Bakersfield.com, in the recent article “Estate planning tips for small business owners,” provides a plan that can protect your life’s work.

It makes sense. You’ve likely spent decades building your business throughout your working life. You’re proud of what you have accomplished, and you should be. You should then protect it with a well-thought-out plan. Your estate planning attorney will be able to help you design a plan for your business and your personal life that considers three questions. For business owners, the answers to these three questions are usually intertwined.

1) Can you avoid taxes?

Reviewing the tax consequences of your personal and business assets as part of your estate plan is the best way to minimize the tax exposure of your estate. This review should also include considerations that come up when trying to facilitate an organized sale or succession plan for your business. You can’t completely avoid taxes, but good planning will help them from being excessive.

There are a number of IRS sections that can help, and your estate planning attorney will know them. For example, Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 6166 gives your loved ones more time to pay the tax by having it paid in ten annual installments. Another provision, IRC Section 303, lets your family redeem stock with few tax penalties. Talk with your attorney and CPA to find out if your business is eligible for either of these strategies. Create a plan and talk about it in detail with survivors to help them navigate the transition.

2) Do you have a buy-sell agreement in place?

This is critical, particularly if more than one person owns the business. The buy-sell agreement dictates how a partnership or LLC is distributed upon the death or incapacity of one of the owners. Without an agreement, family members may be stuck owning a company they don’t want or don’t know anything about. Alternatively, your former partners may find themselves partnered with people with whom they never intended to go into business.

The buy-sell agreement creates a plan for what happens when an owner passes. Frequently, the terms state that the shares of the company must be bought out by the other owners at a fair market price. The agreement can even establish a sale price, so family members will know exactly what they can expect to receive from the sale. In addition, a buy-sell agreement can be used to block certain individuals from taking a role in the business. For many family businesses, that’s enough of a reason to make sure to have a buy-sell agreement.

3) Should you purchase a life insurance policy?

Maybe you want the business to die with you. Some small businesses provide a stable income for the owner, but there’s no plan for the business to be passed to another family member or to survive the passing of the owner. If that is your situation, then you should consider having a life insurance policy so that your family can continue to have income after your death.

In the event you want the business to continue for your partners, but not for your family, a life insurance policy can also be used to help partners with the capital they’ll need to purchase your shares, if that is how your buy-sell agreement has been set up.

As a small business owner and a family breadwinner, you want to be sure your family and your business are prepared for your passing. Talk with your estate planning attorney to make sure both are protected.

Reference: Bakersfield.com (July 15, 2019) “Estate planning tips for small business owners”

Second Marriage? Make Sure Your Estate Plan Is Ready

It’s always a good idea to review your estate plan, especially when a major life event, like a second marriage, is taking place. The use of pre-nuptial agreements gives prospective spouses the opportunity to discuss one another’s rights of inheritance and clarify a great many issues, says nwi.com in the article “Estate Planning: Planning for second marriages.”

There’s a second opportunity to sign an agreement detailing inheritance rights after the wedding takes place, called a “post-nuptial agreement.” The problem is that once the wedding has occurred and you are both legally married, you might get stuck with some surprises and, well, you’re married. For most people, it’s better to set things out before the wedding, rather than after.

Having the discussion prior to marriage can also help with financially planning your life together. There may have been dissolution decrees in one or both of the couple’s prior divorces that have requirements which must be satisfied, such as maintaining a life insurance policy with the ex-spouse as a beneficiary. This can have an impact on the couple’s estate plan. Because of arrangements like this, it is recommended that you have everything discussed upfront in the pre-nup.

There are also additional steps that should be followed for any estate review upon a marriage. First, make sure that the last will and testament reflects your new spouse. For second marriages in particular, you want to make sure any mention of the prior spouse lists them as just that, a prior spouse only.

Next, verify and confirm how all of the assets are owned. Will they continue to be owned by just one spouse, or converted to jointly owned? Does your estate plan have a trust, and if so, are assets owned by the trust? Does there need to be a change made to your trustees?

Many people don’t remember how their bank accounts are titled. Fewer still can tell you who their beneficiaries are on their retirement accounts, life insurance policies and bank accounts. Remember: the beneficiary designations are going to determine who receives these assets, regardless of any language in your last will and testament. Once you die, there is no way to contest that distribution. Review your accounts and make sure that the beneficiaries are up to date, especially if you want to remove your prior spouse from your designations.

Part of your pre-nup and estate plan review should include a discussion of inheritance rights for any children in the blended family. Do you want to leave assets only for your children, or do you want to leave assets for all the children? It’s not an easy conversation to have, especially at the start of the blending process.

Remember also that blended family dynamics can change over the years. When you review your estate plan next—in three to four years—you’ll have the opportunity to make changes that hopefully will reflect deepening bonds between all of the family members. Your estate planning attorney will help create and revise estate plans as your life circumstances evolve.

Reference: nwi.com (May 5, 2019) “Estate Planning: Planning for second marriages”

Do I Need Life Insurance in My Estate Plan?

Not sure why you need to consider life insurance when planning your estate during retirement? You’re not alone if you don’t fully understand the value and benefits that life insurance can give you as part of a retirement plan. Kiplinger’s recent article, “Don’t Overlook Advantages of Making Insurance Part of Your Retirement Plan,” says many folks see life insurance as a way to protect a family from the loss of income in the event a breadwinner passes away during their working years.

If that’s your primary purpose in buying a life insurance policy, it’s a solid one. However, there are many additional benefits that life insurance can bring to your estate plan during retirement, including that income-replacement function.

When a spouse passes away during retirement, the surviving spouse frequently struggles financially. Some living expenses might be less when there’s just one person in a household, but the reduction in costs rarely makes up for the drop in income. One of the two Social Security checks the couple was getting goes away, and a pension payment may also be lost or reduced by 50% or 75%. Life insurance can be leveraged to make certain there’s sufficient cash to compensate for that missing income. This lets the surviving spouse maintain their standard of living in retirement.

Aside from income-replacement, life insurance programs can be good tax planning. There are several sections of the tax laws that give life insurance some income tax and transfer tax benefits. For example, death benefits typically are paid income-tax-free to beneficiaries and may also be free from estate taxes, provided the estate stays under the taxable limit. Also, any benefits paid prior to the insured’s death because of chronic or terminal illness also are tax-free. This is called an accelerated death benefit (ADB) and is a pretty new option. If your insurance doesn’t have this coverage, it can probably be added as a rider. Finally, cash values can grow within a permanent life insurance policy without being subject to income tax.

A life insurance policy can also provide some needed cash flow. Any cash value in the policy that is more than the policy owner’s tax basis can be borrowed income-tax-free as long as the policy stays in effect. But take caution when borrowing against your policy: if you were to pass away prior to paying back your policy loan, the loan balance plus interest accrued is deducted from the death benefit given to the beneficiaries. This may be an issue if your beneficiaries require the entire amount of the intended benefit.

Another consequence to consider is that interest that accrues during the period when the loan remains unpaid is added to the principal balance of the loan. If the loan balance increases above the amount of the cash value, your policy could lapse. That means you could you risk termination by the insurance carrier. If a policy lapses or is surrendered, the loan balance plus interest is considered taxable, and the taxes owed could be pretty hefty based on the initial loan and interest accrued.

Keep in mind, though, that life insurance comes with some costs that should be considered in light of your entire estate plan. There are fees that can include sales charges, administrative expenses, and surrender charges. That’s in addition to the cost of the insurance, which grows as you age.

The most important thing to remember at the end of the day is this: just because you’re retired doesn’t mean you don’t still need the protections and benefits life insurance can offer you and your family.

Reference: Kiplinger (July 10, 2019) “Don’t Overlook Advantages of Making Insurance Part of Your Retirement Plan”

Are Inheritances Taxable?

Inheritances come in all sizes and shapes. People inherit financial accounts, real estate, jewelry, and personal items. Whatever kind of inheritance you have, you’ll want to understand exactly what, if any, taxes might be due, advises the article “Will I Pay Taxes on My Inheritance” from Orange Town News. An inheritance might have an impact on Medicare premiums or financial aid eligibility for a college-age child. This post looks at some different assets and how they may impact a family’s tax liability.

Bank Savings Accounts or CDs. As long as the cash inherited is not from a retirement account, there are no federal taxes due. The IRS does not impose a federal inheritance tax. However, there are some states, including Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Nebraska, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, that do have an inheritance tax. Speak with an estate planning attorney about this tax.

Primary Residence or Other Real Estate. Inheriting a home is not a taxable event. However, once you take ownership and sell the home or other property, there will be taxes due on any gains. The value of the home or property is established on the day of death. If you inherit a home valued at death at $250,000 and you sell it a year later for $275,000, you’ll have to declare a long-term capital gain and pay taxes on the $25,000 gain. The cost-basis is determined when you take ownership.

Life Insurance Proceeds. Life insurance proceeds are not taxable, nor are they reported as income by the beneficiaries. There are exceptions: if interest is earned, which can happen when receipt of the proceeds is delayed, that must be reported as income. The beneficiary will receive a Form 1099-INT and that interest is taxable by the state and federal tax agencies. If the proceeds from the life insurance policy are transferred to an individual as part of an arrangement before the insured’s death, they are also fully taxable.

Retirement Accounts: 401(k) and IRA. Distributions from an inherited traditional IRA are taxable, just as they are for non-inherited IRAs. Distributions from an inherited Roth IRA are not taxable unless the Roth was established within the five years prior to inheritance.

There are some changes coming to retirement accounts because of pending legislation, so it will be important to check on this with your estate planning attorney. Inherited 401(k) plans are or eventually will be taxable, but the tax rate depends upon the rules of the 401(k) plan. Many 401(k) plans require a lump-sum distribution upon the death of the owner. The surviving spouse is permitted to roll the 401(k) into an IRA, but if the beneficiary is not a spouse, they may have to take the lump-sum payment and pay the resulting taxes.

Stocks. Generally, when stocks or funds are sold, capital gains taxes are paid on any gains that occurred during the period of ownership. When stock is inherited, the cost basis is based on the fair market value of the stock or fund at the date of death.

Artwork and Jewelry. Collectibles, artwork, or jewelry that is inherited and then sold will incur a tax on the net gain of the sale. There is a 28% capital gains tax rate, compared to a 15% to 20% capital gains tax rate that applies to most capital assets. The value is based on the value at the date of death or the alternate valuation date. This asset class includes anything that is considered an item worth collecting: rare stamps, books, fine art, antiques and coin collections fall into this category.

Speak with an estate planning attorney before signing and accepting an inheritance, so you’ll know what kind of tax liability comes with the inheritance. Take your time. Most people are advised to wait about a year before making any big financial decisions after a loss.

Reference: Orange Town News (May 29, 2019) “Will I Pay Taxes on My Inheritance”

Here’s How You Know You’re an Adult: 10 Documents

Fifty is a little on the late side to start taking care of these important life matters. However, it is better late than never. It’s easy to put these tasks off, since the busyness of our day-to-day lives gives us a good reason to procrastinate on the larger issues, like death and our own mortality. However, according to Charlotte Five’s article “For ultimate adulting status, have these 10 documents by the time you’re 35,” the time to act is now.

Here are the ten documents you need to get locked down.

A Will. The last will and testament does not have to be complicated. However, it does need to be prepared properly, so that it will be valid. If your family includes minor children, you need to name a guardian. Pick an executor who will be in charge when you pass. If you don’t have a will, the law of your state will determine how your assets are distributed, and a court will name a guardian for your children. It is better to have a will and put your wishes down in writing.

Life insurance. There are two basic kinds: term insurance, which covers about twenty years, and universal or whole, which covers you for your lifetime. You need enough to cover your liabilities: your home mortgage, college funding for your kids and any outstanding debts, like credit cards or a car loan. This way, you aren’t saddling heirs with your debt.

Durable power of attorney. This document lets you designate someone to pay your bills, manage your money and make financial decisions for you, if you become incapacitated. Without it, your relatives will need to go to court to be appointed power of attorney/conservator. Pick a trusted person and have the form done, when you meet with your estate planning attorney.

Twice your annual income in savings. Most Americans don’t do this. However, if you start saving, no matter how small an amount, you’ll be glad you did. You need savings to avoid creating debt, if an emergency occurs. A cash cushion of six months’ worth of monthly expenses in a savings account will give you peace of mind.

Insurance coverage. Make sure that you have the right insurance in place, in addition to life insurance. That means health insurance, auto insurance, and disability insurance.

Credit report. People with better credit reports get better rates on home and auto loans. You can get them free from the big credit reporting services. Make sure everything is correct, from your address to your account history.

A letter of instruction. Where do you keep your estate planning documents? What about your bank statements, taxes and insurance documents? What about your digital assets? Keep a list for easy access for those who might have to figure out your affairs.

Retirement plan. Most people only know they don’t have enough saved for retirement. That’s not good enough. If you aren’t enrolled in your company’s 401(k) or other retirement savings plan, get on that right away. If your company matches contributions, make sure you are saving enough to get every bit of those matching dollars. If your company doesn’t have a retirement plan, then open an IRA or a Roth IRA on your own. You should try to contribute as much as you possibly can.

Updated resume. It also helps to do the same thing with your LinkedIn profile. No matter how long you’ve been in your field, everyone looks at your LinkedIn profile to see who you are and what and who you know. Make sure you have an updated resume, so you can easily send it out, whether it’s a casual conversation about a speaking opportunity or if you’re starting to look for a new position.

A budget. Here’s how you know you’re really an adult. Budgets went out of fashion for a while, but now they are bigger than avocado toast. If you don’t know what’s coming in and what’s going out, you can’t possibly have any kind of control or direction over your financial life. Start tracking your expenses, matching with your income and making any necessary changes.

One last thing—do you have a bucket list? Don’t wait until you’re 70 to consider all the places you’d like to go or the people you’d like to meet. It’s true–you only live once, and we should enjoy the ride.

Reference: Charlotte Five (April 23, 2019) “For ultimate adulting status, have these 10 documents by the time you’re 35”

How to Pay for Assisted Living or a Nursing Home

Senior living can be costly, but with a little creativity, you can find multiple options to help you pay for the Assisted Living or a Nursing Home expense. You might also not need as much money as you think as Senior housing developments include some costs that you have to pay for out of pocket, while you still live in your own home.

For example, if you pay $100 a month to have your grass cut, you will most likely not have this item as a separate expense at the facility. If your monthly bill at the senior housing development includes some meals, that service will replace some of your current costs as well. Nonetheless, you will need to figure out how to pay for assisted living or a nursing home. Here are some options:

Current Income

Some people have enough money from their current income to pay for living in a senior community. For example, a person who receives $2,000 a month from Social Security, $4,000 a month from an annuity, and $1,000 a month in interest, dividends and investment income can use current income to pay for a facility that charges up to $7,000 a month.

Savings

For many people, current income is insufficient to cover the entire cost of a senior housing development. Let’s say that your current income is $3,000 a month and the assisted living center charges $5,000 a month. If you have enough savings, you can supplement your income to make up the difference. At $2,000 a month, you will have to spend $24,000 a year of your savings to live in senior housing.

Proceeds from Sale of the Home

Quite a few people plan to sell the large family home and downsize into a senior apartment or other development, when they retire. Proceeds from the sale of your home can go a long way toward helping to pay for senior housing, depending on the amount of equity in your house.

Reverse Mortgage

Reverse mortgages are not for everyone. There have been shocking scandals, in which unscrupulous lenders heartlessly took the entire nest eggs of older adults who did not understand all the terms and conditions of reverse mortgages. Be sure to check with multiple sources, like your state’s attorney general office and a trusted financial advisor who has nothing to gain from you getting a reverse mortgage, before agreeing to one of these arrangements. Read every word of all the documents and do not sign until you understand every detail. But these tools can be incredibly effective for the right situation and with the right advisor.

Bridge Loan

If you find yourself in urgent need of assisted living, you might get a bridge loan to cover the costs of senior housing until your house sells. Compare the interest rate and terms of a bridge loan to a home equity line of credit.

Military Benefits

If you or your spouse served in the military, you might be eligible for Veterans Administration (VA) programs like Aid and Attendance. This program can help pay for nursing home care, assisted living, in-home care and memory care.

Long-term Care Insurance

Although fewer than three percent of Americans buy long-term care insurance, those who do can use the benefits to pay for assisted living, memory care, or a nursing home, depending on the coverage. Be sure to read the terms of the policy with great care, particularly about how long you can receive benefits and for what services.

Medicaid

After you spend down most of your assets, you might qualify for Medicaid. No organization pays for more people to live in senior housing than Medicaid does. Every state has a different Medicaid program, and each one has its own eligibility requirements. It is a good idea to talk with an elder law attorney in your area about how your state’s regulations differ from the general law of this article. But of course, before spending it all down, research your options to be sure that you are making informed decisions to pay for Assisted Living or a Nursing Home.

If you are assisting a loved one with their planning, be sure to research all options.

References:

A Place for Mom. “How to Finance.” (accessed April 14, 2019) https://www.aplaceformom.com/planning-and-advice/articles/financial-assistance