How Do I Protect Property If I Need Long-Term Care?

How Do I Protect Property If I Need Long-Term Care?

Nearly 90% of those over age 65 would say they’d prefer to stay in their home and live independently as they age. However, even if you are one of those people, you need to make certain that you have a long-term care plan in place to ensure your assets can go toward the things you want, rather than unexpected healthcare costs.

The Observer-Reporter’s recent article entitled “Protecting Your Assets is Only Half of Your Long-Term Plan” explains that there are many factors, like chronic conditions and lifestyle choices, that can increase healthcare expenditures as you get older. Understanding and planning for the potential costs now, could be the difference between spending your savings on health care expenses, instead of on the things you want.

You may be concerned about being a burden to family and friends as you age. That’s common since nearly three-quarters (72%) of parents expect their children to become their long-term caregivers. However, just 40% of those children are aware they were tapped for that role!

Research shows that when family and friends assume the role of primary caregivers, they have a 60% chance of exhibiting clinical signs of depression—six times more than the general population. Having your family and friends become your caregivers may be best for you financially, but it probably isn’t in their best interest.

You should have a sound understanding of the cost and burden that long-term care can put on your family and friends. This is the first step to preparing your long-term plan. It is important to understand that there are a few different long-term planning options available, with varying levels of care coverage. One is Medicaid, which is a means-tested government health insurance plan that can cover some or all of the care you may need in a skilled nursing facility. However, what it covers is income- and asset-based. Medicare may cover some limited long- term care for rehabilitation but typically not custodial care.

There is also long-term care insurance which can fill many of the gaps that Medicare and Medicaid may leave. Most plans are customizable and have options for full or partial coverage for all of the types of long-term care. However, there may still be gaps in your coverage.

Ask an elder law attorney about other options and resources.

Reference: (Washington, PA) Observer-Reporter (Feb. 17, 2020) “Protecting Your Assets is Only Half of Your Long-Term Plan”