Family Gatherings Often Reveal Changes in Aging Family Members

A look in the refrigerator finds expired foods and elderly family members are asking the same questions repeatedly. The same person who would never let you walk into the house with your shoes on now is living in a mess. The children agree Mom or Dad can’t live on their own anymore. It’s time to look into other options.

One of the biggest questions, according to the Cherokee Tribune & Ledger-News’ article is “How to pay for long-term care.”

The cost can depend significantly on the types of facilities being considered. There are many different options but the distinctions between them are often misunderstood. Assisted living facilities provide lodging, meals, assistance with eating, bathing, toileting, dressing, medication management, and transportation. However, a skilled nursing facility adds more comprehensive health care services. There’s also the personal care home, which provides assisted-living type accommodations, but on a smaller scale.

The question of how to pay for the residential care of an elderly family member weighs heavily on the family. That elderly person is often the one who did the caregiving for so many years, and the reversal of roles can be emotionally difficult.

There are a few different ways people pay for care for an elderly family member.

Long-term care insurance, or LTC insurance. Few elderly people have the insurance to cover their residential facility stay, but some do. Ask if such a policy exists, or go through the piles of paperwork to see if there is one. It will be worth the search.

Veteran’s benefits. If your loved one or their spouse served during certain times of war, is over 65 or is disabled and received an honorable discharge, he or she may be entitled to certain programs that pay for care through the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Private pay. If your loved one has financial accounts or other assets, they may need to pay the cost of their residential facility from these assets. If they don’t have assets, the family may wish to contribute to their care.

Apply for Medicaid/Medi-Cal. An elder law attorney in their state of residence will be able to help the individual and their family navigate the application, explore if there are any options to preserving assets like the family home, and help with the necessary legal strategy and documents that need to be prepared.

Meet with an elder law estate planning attorney to learn what the steps are to help your elderly loved one enjoy their quality of life, as they move into this next phase of their life.

Reference: Cherokee Tribune & Ledger-News (November 30, 2019) “How to pay for longterm care.”

Making a Clean Start for 2020? Here’s Help

Some people like to start their New Year’s off with a clean slate, going through the past year’s files and tossing or shredding anything they don’t absolutely need. However, many don’t, in part because we’re not sure exactly what documents we need to keep, and which we can toss. This article from AARP Magazine provides the missing information so you can get started: “When to Keep, Shred or Scan Important Papers.”

Tax Returns. In general, you only need to keep the tax returns and supporting documents that extend back to the IRS’s window of time to audit taxpayers. The can only audit you for three years after the end of the taxable year, or when you submitted your tax return, whichever is later. This means unless you’re planning on running for office, keeping the tax returns and supporting documentation for the last three tax years is usually enough. However, if the IRS finds that there is a substantial error, which usually means you omitted 25% or more of your income, in any of those three years, then the time period doubles to six years.

Regardless of how you earn your income, start by visiting MySocialSecurity.gov account before shredding to make sure that your income is being accurately recorded. Having your tax records in hand will make it easier to get any figures fixed.

As for documents regarding homeownership, keep records related to the home until you sell the house. You can use home-improvement receipts to possibly reduce taxes at that time.

Banking and Investments. If you or your spouse might be applying for Medicaid/Medi-Cal to pay nursing home costs, you’ll need to have five years of financial records. That includes bank statements, credit card statements, and statements from a brokerage or financial advisors. This is so the government can look for any asset transfers that might delay eligibility.

If that’s not the case, then you only need banking and financial statements for a year, except for those issued for income-related purposes to provide the IRS with a record of tax-related transactions. Your bank or credit card issuer may have online statements going back several years online. However, if not, download statements and save them in a password-protected folder on your home computer.

Stocks and bond purchases should be kept for six years after filing the return reporting the sale of the security. Again, this is for the IRS.

If you have a stack of canceled checks, shred them. Almost every bank and credit union today have an electronic version of your checks.

Medical Records. These are the records you want to keep indefinitely, especially if you have had a serious illness or injury. The information may make a difference in how your physicians treat you in the future, so normal or not, hang on to the following documents: surgical reports, hospital discharge summaries, and treatment plans for major illnesses. Put these in a password-protected folder in your computer or a secure cloud-based account, so they can be shared with future healthcare providers. You should also keep immunization and vaccination records. The goal is to have your own medical records and not to rely on your doctor’s office for these documents, as many doctor’s offices do not have accessible or electronic records. This is especially true if you have had appointments with multiple offices for your care.

Maintain proof of payments to medical providers for six years, with the relevant tax return, in case the IRS questions a health care deduction.

Use the information above as a guideline to help you make a clean start with your paperwork for 2020, and remember to put your documents in one secure place that your successor agents can find.

Reference: AARP Magazine (August 5, 2019) “When to Keep, Shred or Scan Important Papers”

What Should I Know About Medicaid?

Medicaid is the federal program that gives healthcare benefits to those who cannot afford them. Many people who end up requiring long-term care can pay for it out of their own assets, at least initially.

However, because long-term care expenses are so astronomical, many people end up accessing Medicaid benefits, after their own assets have been depleted.

The Medicaid program can help with paying for home care, assisted living, and nursing home care, explains Insurance News Net’s recent article, “Medicaid planning.”

It would be great if people would plan to qualify for Medicaid before they become completely broke, which would preserve their children’s inheritance.

For those who are thinking of transferring all of their assets to their children to qualify for Medicaid, the government has already thought of that. If you gift any assets to your children within the 60 months leading up to the date you apply for Medicaid, the government will calculate a penalty period, depending on the amount of the gift. You will have to wait until the end of the penalty period before you are eligible for Medicaid. However, there are perfectly legal strategies that a senior can use to become eligible for Medicaid, while still preserving considerable assets for their family and children.

That’s why you should talk to an elder law or Medicaid planning attorney. These practitioners specialize in helping people qualify for Medicaid benefits far in advance of their assets becoming depleted.

Assets may be freely transferred between spouses to help gain eligibility for a spouse that needs care.

There are also many assets that are exempt for purposes of gaining eligibility. This includes a primary residence, certain IRAs and most vehicles.

It’s also important to remember that a person can enter into contracts with family members to provide care in exchange for a fee. The payments to family members won’t be considered a gift for the 60-month lookback period.

With the guidance and planning from qualified legal counsel, seniors who require long-term care can get the benefit of government healthcare, while preserving assets for their heirs.

Please contact an experienced Medicaid planning or elder law attorney for additional information.

Reference: Insurance News Net (September 29, 2019) “Medicaid planning”

How to Plan for Long-Term Care Costs

The odds are that most of us will need long-term care. At least 52% of those over age 65 will need some type of long-term care at some point in our lives, according to a study conducted by AARP. As most of us are living longer, we’ll probably need that care for a longer period of time, as reported in the article “It’s best to plan for long-term care” from the Times Herald-Record.

Many people 55 and older tend to believe that they might be in the group that won’t need any sort of long-term care. Here’s the problem: ignore this issue, and it won’t go away. It is true that turning a blind eye can be tempting because the size of the problem makes it a bit overwhelming, and the cost to tackle it seems unsolvable. However, not addressing it becomes even more expensive. How can we possibly pay for long-term care insurance?

Here’s a simple example: a 64-year-old woman fell and broke her ankle in three places. She was otherwise healthy and mobile prior to the fall. However, a badly broken ankle required extensive rehabilitation and she was not able to stay in her home. She has been living at a rehabilitation center and the costs are mounting. What could she have done?

There are two basic ways (with a number of variations) to pay for long-term care.

The first and most obvious: purchase a long-term care insurance policy. Only 2.7 million Americans own these policies. They are wise to protect themselves and their families.

Most families put off buying this kind of insurance because it’s expensive at any age and stage. The average cost is about $2,170, according to the Kiplinger Retirement Report, for about $328,000 worth of insurance. That rate varies, and it should be noted that if you have a chronic condition, you may not be able to purchase a policy at all.

If local nursing homes costs $216,000 per year and you have $328,000 of coverage, the numbers make it obvious that you will likely run out of coverage before your needs are fully met. The average nursing home stay is about two years. As boomers age, the cost of long-term care insurance is rising, while benefits are becoming skimpier, says Kiplinger.

There are some alternatives: a hybrid life insurance plan that includes long-term care coverage.  However, those can be more expensive than regular long-term care insurance, with the cost sometimes being about $8,000 a year for a 55-year-old and about $13,000 for a 65-year-old.

Another choice: a Medicaid Asset Protection Trust. For best results, you’ll need to work with an estate planning attorney to create and fund this trust long before you actually need it. Your assets must be placed in the trust at least five years before an application to Medicaid, which will then pay for your care. You don’t have to live in complete poverty to do this. If the care is for one person, the applicant is permitted to keep a certain amount of assets, which vary depending on your specific state laws (in California, that amount is $2,000). The Medicaid rules also provide a number of noncountable resources, which means that those items won’t be counted against your asset limits. This includes a home, the value of retirement accounts, and term life insurance.  The spouse may also keep assets of their own up to about $120,000, although this number also varies by state.

However, what if you have money to pay or need long-term care before you put assets in trust? If you live in New York, Florida and Connecticut, you have what is called “spousal refusal.” The spouse of the person in long-term care can choose not to pay for their cost of care. This can get complicated, and Medicaid will try to get funds for the care. However, an estate planning elder law attorney can negotiate the amount of payment, which may leave the bulk of your estate intact.

These are complicated matters that become very costly, often at a time when you and your family are least able to deal with yet another issue. Speak with an estate planning attorney before you need the care and learn how they can help you protect your spouse and your assets.

Reference: Times Herald-Record (July 22, 2019) “It’s best to plan for long-term care”

Are You Prepared to Age in Place?

If aging in place is your goal, then long-term planning needs to be considered. Some things to think about include how the house will function as you age, whether there will be accommodations for the people who will care for you, and how to pay for the care that you might need, says the Record Online in the article “Start planning now so you can ‘age in place.’”

Many homes will need to be remodeled for aging in place, and those changes could be big or small. Some changes that almost everyone has to consider include installing ramps and adding a bathroom and bedroom on the first floor. Smaller changes include installing properly anchored grab bars in the shower, improving lighting, and changing or updating the floor covering to avoid problems with walkers, wheelchairs or unsteady seniors.

Choosing a caregiver and paying for care is sometimes difficult to think about, oftentimes because they are intertwined issues. Many adult children become caregivers for aging parents, and for the most part, they are unpaid. Family caregivers suffer enormous losses, including lost work, career advancement, income, and savings. Stress and neglect of their own health and family is a common byproduct.

You’ll want to speak with an estate planning eldercare attorney about how or if the parent may compensate the child for their caregiving. If the parent is applying for Medicaid and the payment is deemed to be a gift, it will cause a penalty period, when Medicaid won’t pay for care. A caregiver agreement drafted by an elder law estate planning attorney will allow the parents to pay the children that provide them care without having it be considered a gift or triggering a penalty period. Keep in mind, though, that the child will need to report this income on their tax returns.

The best way to plan ahead for aging in place is to purchase a long-term care insurance policy. If you qualify for a policy and can afford to pay for it, it is a good way to protect assets and income from going towards caregiver costs. You can also relieve the family caregiver from duties or pay them for caregiving out of the insurance proceeds.

Without long-term care insurance, the next option is to apply for community and in-home care through Medicaid to pay for care in the home, if available in your state. To qualify, a single applicant can keep $15,450 in assets plus the house, up to an equity limit of $878,000 and only $878 per month of income. For a married couple, when one spouse applies for community Medicaid, the couple may keep $22,800 in assets plus the house and $1,287 per month of income. If the applicant or spouse is on a managed care plan, the couple may keep even more assets and income.

Another option is spousal refusal, which may allow the couple to keep more assets and income. When an applicant has too much income, a pooled income trust may be used to shelter income from going towards the cost of care. This is a complicated process that requires working with an estate planning attorney to ensure that it is set up correctly.

Self-paying for home care is another option, but it is expensive. The average cost of home health care in some areas is $25 per hour or $600 per day for around-the-clock care. When you get to these costs, they are the same as an expensive nursing home.

Planning in advance with careful analysis of the different choices will give the individual and the family the best picture of what may come with aging in place. A better decision can be made, once all the information is clearly assessed.

Reference: Record Online (Aug. 31, 2019) “Start planning now so you can ‘age in place’”

Can the Golden Girls Model Work for Families?

Multi-generational living is not exactly new, and as people are living longer, it may start becoming more common. Shared households bring many benefits, including convenience. Why should a nurse’s daughter travel 20 miles a day to take her mom’s blood pressure when living together works better, asks The Mercury’s article “Do shared living arrangements make sense?”

There’s also the benefit of increased financial security. Two households merged into one can share expenses, including mortgages, property taxes, utilities and more.

Whether this works in each case depends upon the situation and the relationships of the individuals involved. If there is flexibility and the relationships are good, it can be a blessing. Imagine grandparents and grandchildren who are part of each other’s lives on a daily basis, rather than a twice-a-year visit. That’s a gift.

The arrangement needs to start with a lot of discussions and understanding the wants and needs of each participant. It needs to be based on reasonable expectations. A happy joint living arrangement can swiftly be derailed, for instance, if parents assume that grandparents are willing to be 24/7 babysitters, or if grandparents consider household chores something only for their children and grandchildren to do.

Joining living arrangements must also address financial considerations, estate planning and everyone’s personal experiences and convictions. What works for one family may not work at all for another. Each family must work through their own details.

Here are some examples where a joint living arrangement works.

Parents and children buy a house together. When parents and children live too far away, and the parent’s house would require too much modification for them to continue to live there, both sell their homes and buy a much bigger home that can be made handicapped accessible. The parents make most of the down payment. The house is titled in joint names. Titling is critical. One half is owned by the father and mother, the other half is owned by the adult child and their spouse. Each half would be tenants by entireties (in states where that form of ownership between spouses is available) as between the spouses, but joint tenants with rights of survivorship as to the whole.

Parent moves in with adult child. A widow or widower comes to live with a son or daughter and their family. The parent makes contributions to the monthly expenses. There is a written agreement, which is very important for Medicaid rules regarding gifting. If modifications need to be made to the house—a mother-in-law suite—a written agreement details who contributed what, so that it is not considered a “gift” by Medicaid.

Adult child moves in with parent. This is a “buy-in,” where an adult child obtains a home equity line of credit to purchase an interest as a joint tenant with right of survivorship. The house can be inherited by paying one-half of the value.

None of these strategies should be done without the help of an elder law attorney who is knowledgeable about Medicaid, estate planning and real estate ownership. When it works, this arrangement can benefit everyone in the family.

Reference: The Mercury (AuG. 28, 2019) “Do shared living arrangements make sense?”

Can You Protect Your Home If You Need Medicaid?

Anyone who owns a home, whether a magnificent mansion or a modest ranch, worries about the possibility of losing the home because of long-term care. How can they keep the home for their spouse or even for their family, if they need to apply to Medicaid for long-term nursing care costs?

The problem, reports The Mercury in a recent article “Protecting your house and Medicaid” is that people often come up with strategies on their own. And these strategies usually don’t work.

The first thought of someone who is confronted with the need to qualify for Medicaid is to immediately transfer ownership of the family home to another person. The idea is to take the home out of their countable assets. But unless the person who receives the house is an adult child, that transfer only leads to problems.

Medicaid’s basic premise is that if you can afford to pay for your own care, you should. Transfer of a home, let’s say one with a value of $400,000, means that a $400,000 gift has been given to someone. When you apply for Medicaid, there is a five-year lookback period. Any assets given away or transferred in that five-year period is considered to be an asset that was under your control. Medicaid will not pay for your care in that case.

There are some exceptions to the gifting rules, but this is not something to be navigated without the help of an experienced elder law estate planning attorney. Here are the exceptions:

Assets for your spouse. It’s understood that your spouse needs a place to live, and a transfer of the home to your spouse does not result in penalties under Medicaid rules. This usually means transfer from title as joint tenants with rights of survivorship or tenants by the entireties to the healthier wife or husband. It is also understood that a transfer to your spouse at home is not a disqualifying transfer. This is a common practice and part of Medicaid planning.

A disabled child. A parent may transfer a house to their disabled child on the theory that it is needed for self-support. It is not necessary for a child to lose a home, because a parent will be on Medicaid. This is a common mistake, and completely avoidable. Talk with an elder law attorney to learn more.

If a child is a caretaker. Sometimes an adult child moves into the parents’ home to care for the ailing parents. When a child moves in with the parents for a period of at least two years to care for them so they could stay at home and avoid going to a nursing home, or if the child has lived with their parents for longer than that and they need this care at home, then under federal law the home can be transferred to the child without penalty and the parent can go to a nursing home and receive care under Medicaid. Not knowing about this rule may sometimes lead the parents to transfer a house to someone else, and that is another very common mistake that causes adult children to be left without a home.

For a person who is single or a widow or widower who will never move home after moving into a Medicaid certified nursing home, the house may be sold, and planning can be done with the proceeds of the sale. Paying bills to maintain a vacant home for no reason and having the government take the home as a creditor through the estate recovery program does not make sense. Laws also vary significantly by state. An elder lawyer estate planning attorney can help navigate this complex and often overwhelming process.

Reference: The Mercury (July 31, 2019) “Protecting your house and Medicaid”

Advance Planning Key for Alzheimer’s Patients

A retired physician and his wife have allowed a local television station to report their family’s journey with Alzheimer’s over the course of the last four years. The series continues with WCCO CBS Minnesota’s article “All Lined Up Before You Need It’: Alzheimer’s Association Shares Steps for Estate Planning,” with four steps to take if you notice that a family member is having memory lapses or trouble with simple tasks.

The Quinn family—Dr. Paul Quinn and his wife Peg—had some tough conversations years ago. This was a period when Paul’s memory was better, and when he was able to be completely honest with his wife about his wishes and what the couple would need to do moving forward.

Peg Quinn said that getting everything lined up long before it’s needed is very important.

If there’s any sign of cognitive decline, there are legal and financial steps that must be pursued. Start with addressing the family budget and projected medical costs for long term care. If possible, gather all family members together for a planning session.

If they live in different parts of the state, or of the country, ask the family members to travel for a weekend family meeting. This is the kind of planning that is better when everyone is physically present.

Start by naming a power of attorney. It needs to be someone who is aware of the situation and will be able to make decisions on behalf of the diagnosed individual. An estate planning attorney can assist in making this decision.

Next, establish an advance health care directive with a focus on medical decisions. This may be the toughest part since it is impossible to know how long someone will live with Alzheimer’s, or what kind of lifestyle that person would be living. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, the average patient lives between four to eight years while suffering from Alzheimer’s. The cost of care can add up fast—as much as $5,000 to $7,000 a month in some cases.

That’s why the next step—selecting an elder law estate planning attorney is so important. Planning for long-term care, qualifying for Medicaid and other benefits, is a complex challenge.

Dr. Quinn expressed his wishes to stay in his home as long as possible. The familiarity of their home makes life much easier for both of them, so they agreed early on to have in-home care if it’s ever needed.

An estate planning attorney can help the family by drafting any necessary estate planning documents and creating a plan as early as possible. A trust must be created and executed before the person is legally incompetent. The same goes for a power of attorney and any health care power of attorney documents. Medicaid planning should be done as soon as possible since there is a five-year look-back period concerning transferring any assets.

Whether you or a family member just got a diagnosis or already in the throes of Alzheimer’s, consult an estate planning attorney to review any documents or arrangements to ensure that your affairs are in order and that you are prepared for the future.

Reference: WCCO CBS Minnesota (July 23, 2019) “’All Lined Up Before You Need It’ : Alzheimer’s Association Shares Steps for Estate Planning”

Prior Planning for Catasrophes

None of us know what kind of unexpected surprises will occur in our lives. We’d like to believe they will all be happy events, like winning the big Power Ball jackpot. However, unpleasant things like illness or a flood or fire often occur. We never think it will happen to us, says The Dalles Chronicle’s article “Prepare now for emergencies.” Unfortunately, these things do happen, and when they do, being prepared can make all the difference between a stressful situation and a really awful situation that could have been made, well, less awful.

For starters, have you met with an estate planning attorney to create a comprehensive estate plan that includes a will or trust, a financial power of attorney and a health care power of attorney? The will/trust concerns distribution of your possessions and property, the power of attorney gives a trusted person the ability to take financial and legal actions on your behalf in the event that you become incapacitated, and the medical power of attorney allows someone to make health care decisions for you if you become incapacitated. There are also many other tools that an estate planning attorney can help you with, such as a Special Needs Trust, if your family includes a family member with special needs, or other trusts if they are needed.

Next, your emergency preparations should include having important documents assembled in a notebook, on a memory stick and/or a safe location. Imagine there was an emergency evacuation and you had to leave your home immediately. What documents would you need? Here’s a helpful checklist to look at:

  • Contact information for family members, doctors, attorneys, dentist, insurance broker, financial advisor.
  • Cash, so if ATMs are not working, you will have cash on hand.
  • Identification documents, including originals of your birth certificate, marriage license, divorce papers, passport, Social Security card, health insurance cards (or Medicare or Medicaid cards).
  • A video of your home and all of your possessions on your mobile phone. Consider emailing it to a family member or friend who lives in a different location.
  • Insurance policies for home, auto, disability, long-term care, etc. Include contact information for either 800-numbers or your local agent, if you need to file a claim.
  • A copy of recent financial statements for credit cards, banks, brokerage firms, retirement accounts, car loans, mortgage and similar types of accounts.
  • Copies of the last three years of tax returns. If you work with a CPA, they should have them on a secure portal, but a hard copy will be useful to have.
  • Legal documents for your estate plan, including the will, power of attorney and health care power of attorney, as described above.
  • Other legal documents, including car registration, car title and property deed to your home.

These documents should all be organized in a folder that is placed in your home where you and your spouse know where it is and can grab it on your way out the door.

One more item that should be noted in this digital age: if you use a laptop or tablet that contains websites that you use frequently for personal finance, investments, etc., be mindful of its location in the house, so you can grab it (along with a charger cable) quickly. If you have passwords for accounts—and most of us do—you should print them out and include them in your file folder for easy access. You can almost always re-set a password, but how much easier will rebuilding your life be if you have them on hand?

If you do ever face a catastrophic emergency, having these materials will save you hours of time and stress.

Reference: The Dalles Chronicle (July 16, 2019) “Prepare now for emergencies”

Planning for the Impact of Medicaid

With more and more people aging and requiring long term care, it is important that you understand the options that you have to pay for it, including the possibility of Medicaid. One of the most complicated and fear-inducing aspects of Medicaid (known as Medi-Cal in the state of California) is the financial eligibility. The rules for the cost of long-term care are complicated and can be difficult to understand. This is especially true when the Medicaid applicant is married, reports Delco Times in the article “Medicaid–Protecting Assets for a Spouse.”

Generally speaking, to be eligible for Medicaid long-term care, the applicant may not have more than $2,400 in countable assets in their name, and their gross monthly income may not exceed $2,313. (These numbers are applicable to 2019 and will be adjusted on an annual basis.)

There are Federal laws that mandate certain protections for a spouse so that they do not become impoverished when their spouse enters a nursing home and applies for Medicaid. This is where advance planning with an experienced elder law attorney is needed. The spouse of a Medicaid recipient living in a nursing home, who is referred to as the Community Spouse, is permitted to keep what is known as the “Community Spouse Resource Allowance” without jeopardizing the Medicaid eligibility of the spouse who needs long-term care. Federal law gives states the discretion to choose what the allowance will be for that specific state, but that amount must be between $25,284 and $126,420.

Determining whether you fall within the Community Spouse Resource Allowance requires totaling the countable assets of both the community spouse and the spouse in the long-term care facility, as of the date of admission to the nursing home. The date of admission is referred to as the “snapshot” date, which is the picture that Medicaid programs will look at to determine whether a couple is eligible. If a couple exceeds the Community Spouse Resource Allowance amount, then they must spend down the rest of the assets to qualify for aid.

There are some assets that are exempt from this calculation, so it’s important to know what are considered “countable assets.” Exceptions include personal possessions (such as jewelry, clothing, and furniture), one car, the applicant’s principal residence (if the equity in the home does not exceed $585,500 as of 2019) and assets that are considered inaccessible, such as a spouse’s retirement accounts. Everything else is countable.

There is a similar principle that applies to income, with Federal rules regarding how much the spouse is permitted to earn, which is called the “Minimum Monthly Maintenance Needs Allowance.” Again, this amount varies by state. In some states, the spouse is permitted to keep all of their own income, regardless of the amount.

Another rule some states have is that, if the Community Spouse has income less than the allowed amount, then some of the Medicaid Spouse’s income can be allocated to the Community Spouse. A couple can also request the court to grant them an order to increase the Minimum Monthly Maintenance Needs Allowance if expenses justify it. The rules regarding requests for additional income are also very complicated, so an elder law attorney’s help will be needed to ensure that you are successful in your petition.

These are complicated matters, and not easily navigated. Talk with an experienced elder law estate planning attorney to help plan in advance, if possible. There are many different strategies for Medicaid applications. To find one that fits your family’s needs, consult with an Elder Law attorney.

Reference: Delco Times (June 26, 2019) “Medicaid–Protecting Assets for a Spouse”