What Estate Planning Do I Need with a New Baby?

Congratulations parent! You have a new baby. There’s a lot to think about, but there is a vital task that should be a priority. That is making an estate plan. People usually don’t worry about estate planning when they’re young, healthy and starting a new family. However, your new baby is depending on you to make decisions that will set them up for a secure future.

Motley Fool’s recent article, “If You’re a New Parent, Take These 4 Estate Planning Steps” says there are a few key estate planning steps that every parent should take to make certain they’ve protected their child, no matter what the future holds.

  1. Purchase Life Insurance. If a parent dies, life insurance will make sure there are funds available for the other spouse to keep providing for the children. If both parents die, life insurance can be used for a guardian to raise the child or to fund the cost of college. For most parents, term life insurance is used because the premiums are affordable, and the coverage will be in effect long enough for your child to grow to an adult.
  2. Draft a Will and Name a Guardian for your Children. For parents, the most important reason to make a will is to name a guardian for your children. If you designate a guardian, you can select the person that you think shares your values and who will do a good job raising your children. This way, it’s not left to a judge to make that selection. Do this as soon as your children are born.
  3. Update Beneficiaries. Your will should say what happens to most of your assets, but you probably have some accounts with a designated beneficiary, like a 401(k), IRA, or life insurance. When you have children, you’ll need to update the beneficiaries on these accounts for your children to inherit these assets as secondary beneficiaries, so they will inherit them in the event of your and your spouse’s death. Be careful, however, to designate a custodian to take care of those funds while your children are still minors.
  4. Look at a Trust. If you die prior to your children turning 18, they can’t directly take control of any inheritance you leave for them. This means that a judge may need to appoint someone to manage assets that you leave to your child. Your child could also wind up inheriting a lot of money and property free and clear at age 18. To have more control, like who will manage assets, how your money and property should be used for your children and when your children should directly receive a transfer of wealth, ask your estate planning attorney about creating a trust. With a trust, you can designate an individual who will manage money on behalf of your children and provide instructions for how the trustee can use the money to help care for your children, as they age. You can also create conditions on your children receiving a direct transfer of assets, such as requiring your children to reach age 21 or requiring them to use the money to cover college costs. Trusts are for anyone who wants more control over how their property will help their children after they’ve passed away.

When you have a new baby, working on your estate planning probably isn’t a big priority. However, it’s worth taking the time to talk to an attorney for the security of knowing your bundle of joy can still be provided for, in the event that the worst happens to you.

Reference: Motley Fool (September 28, 2019) “If You’re a New Parent, Take These 4 Estate Planning Steps”

How Joint Tenancy Creates Problem for Seniors

How Joint Tenancy Creates Problem for Seniors
cheerful young woman helping an old person doing paperwork and telephone call

Parents putting children or other family members as joint owners of their assets is another example of what seems like a simple solution for a complex problem. It doesn’t work, even though it seems like it should.

As explained in the article “Beware the joint tenancy trap” from Monterey Herald, putting another person on an account, even a trusted child or life-long friend, can create serious problems for the individual, their estate, and their heirs. Before going down that path, there are several issues to consider.

When another individual is placed as an owner on an account or on the title to real property, they have legal ownership in that property equal to that of the original owner. This is called joint tenancy. If a child is made a joint tenant on a parent’s accounts, they would be entirely within their rights to withdraw every single asset from those accounts and do whatever they wanted with them. They would not need the original owner’s consent, counsel, or knowledge.

Giving anyone that power is a serious decision.

Making a child a joint owner of assets also exposes those assets to claims by the child’s creditors. If they file for bankruptcy, the original asset owner may have to buy back one-half of the asset at its current market value. Another example: if the child is in an accident and a judgment is recorded against the child, you may have to buy back one-half of your joint tenant property at its current market value to settle the claims.

There are other complications that come with the title. If one joint owner of the asset dies, joint tenancy provides for the right of survivorship. The property transfers to the surviving joint tenant without going through probate and with no reference to a will. Even though it can bypass the probate process, it means that the distribution won’t necessarily follow what the parent intended in his estate plan. If the parent dies and the asset transfers directly to the joint tenant—let’s say a daughter—but the will says the assets are to be split between all of the children, her claim on the asset is “senior” to the rest of the children. That means she has the right to keep all of the assets that were held in joint tenancy and all four siblings split the remaining assets.

If there is any friction between siblings, not having equal inheritances could create a fracture in the family that can’t easily be resolved.

Tax exposure is another risk of joint tenancy. When someone is named a joint owner, they have the original owner’s cost basis. When one owner dies, the remaining owner gets a step up in basis only on the proportion of the assets the deceased person owned at death.

Let’s say a son and father are joint owners on an account. When the father dies, the son gets a step-up in basis on one-half of the assets—the assets that the father owned. However, the son’s half retains the original basis. In contrast, if that account was owned solely by the father, all the heirs will inherit the property with a full step-up in basis on the father’s death.

Given the complexities that joint tenancy creates, parents need to think very carefully before putting children’s names on their assets and real property. A better plan is to make an appointment to speak with an estate planning attorney and find out how to protect the parent’s assets through other means, which may include trusts and other estate planning tools.

Reference: Monterey Herald (Sep. 11, 2019) “Beware the joint tenancy trap”

How Do I Deed My Home into a Trust?

Say that a husband used his inheritance to purchase the family home outright. The wife signed a quitclaim deed to him to put the property into his individual living trust with the condition that if he died before his wife, she could live in the home until her death.

But what if the husband or the creator of the trust never signed the living trust? In that case, what would happen to the property if the husband were to die before the wife?

This can quickly become even more complicated if it’s a second marriage for each of the spouses and they have adult children from prior marriages.

The Herald Tribune’s recent article, “Home ownership complications need guidance from estate planning attorney,” says that in this situation it’s important to know if the quitclaim deed was to the husband personally or to his living trust. If the wife quitclaimed the home to her husband personally, he then owns her share of the home, subject to any marital interests she may still have in the home. However, if the wife quitclaimed the home to his living trust, and the trust was never created, the deed may be invalid. The wife may still own the her original interest in the home.

It’s common for a couple to own a home as joint tenants with rights of survivorship. This would have meant that if the wife died, her husband would own the entire property automatically. If he died, she’d own the entire home automatically.

If the wife signed a quitclaim deed over to him or his trust, and the deed was recorded, then she would have transferred her ownership rights to her husband and he would be the sole owner of the home.  If the deed was never even filed or recorded, the wife could simply destroy the document and keep the status of the title as it was.

If the trust doesn’t exist, her quitclaim deed transfer to an entity that doesn’t exist would create a situation where she could claim that she still owned her interest in the home. However, the home may now be owned by the spouses as tenants in common, rather than as joint tenants with rights of survivorship.

To complicate things further, if the husband fully owned the home at the time of his death and the wife has marital rights in the home, then she may still be entitled to a share of the home under her husband’s will, if he has one, or by the laws of intestacy. However, the husband’s children would also own a share of his share of the home. At that point, the wife would co-own the home with his children.

You can see how crazy this can get. It’s best to seek the advice of a qualified estate planning attorney to guide you through the process and make sure that the proper documents get signed and filed or recorded.

Reference: The (Sarasota, FL) Herald Tribune (September 8, 2019) “Home ownership complications need guidance from estate planning attorney”

Why Are the Daughters of the Late Broncos Owner Contesting His Trust?

Beth Wallace and Amie Klemmer, the two oldest daughters of the late owner of the Denver Broncos, Pat Bowlen, filed a lawsuit in a Denver area court challenging the validity of their father’s trust. Specifically, they are arguing that their father didn’t have the mental capacity to properly execute documents and was under undue influence when he signed his estate planning documents in 2009, according to Colorado Public Radio’s recent article “Pat Bowlen’s Kids Are Still Fighting Over Inheritance As 2 Daughters File Lawsuit.”

Dan Reilly, a lawyer for the Patrick Bowlen Trust, said in a statement that it is “sad and unfortunate that Beth Bowlen Wallace and Amie Bowlen Klemmer have elected to contest their father’s plan and attack his personal health,” adding the lawsuit was the “latest effort in their public campaign to circumvent Pat Bowlen’s wishes.”

Bowlen died in June at age 75 after a long battle with Alzheimer’s. He put the trust in place hoping that one of his seven children would succeed him in running the Broncos, a team he purchased in 1984. In addition to the two daughters, he had with his first wife, Sally Parker, Pat Bowlen had five children (Patrick, Johnny, Brittany, Annabel, and Christianna) with his widow, Annabel.

Wallace said in 2018 that she wanted to succeed her father, but the trustees said she was “not capable or qualified.” Likewise, Brittany Bowlen said last fall that she wanted to become the next controlling owner of the Broncos team. She will become part of the team in November in a management position to begin that process.

Reilly said that Wallace and Klemmer never raised the issue of mental capacity until after 2014 “when Ms. Wallace was privately told by the trustees that she was not capable or qualified to serve as controlling owner.”

Last month, Arapahoe County Court Judge John E. Scipione dismissed a lawsuit filed by Bowlen’s brother, Bill. That suit that sought to oust team president and CEO Joe Ellis, team counsel Rich Slivka, and Denver lawyer Mary Kelley as trustees. Bill argued that they weren’t acting in good faith or in Pat’s best interests.

The judge ruled in a separate case over the trust that the court and not the NFL would decide the question of Pat’s mental capacity at the time he updated his estate planning documents 10 years ago.

The trust also has a no-contest clause. In electing to challenge the validity of the trust in court, Wallace and Klemmer are putting themselves at risk of being disinherited, if they’re found in violation of the no-contest clause, and the 2009 trust is upheld in court. Their rights as beneficiaries would bypass them and go to their children.

Reference: Colorado Public Radio (September 14, 2019) “Pat Bowlen’s Kids Are Still Fighting Over Inheritance As 2 Daughters File Lawsuit”

Don’t Forget to Update Your Estate Plan

There are some people who sign their will once in their life and never change it. They may have executed their estate plan late in life, or after they were diagnosed with a serious disease. However, even if your family life and finances are pretty basic, there are still changes in the law that you may need to incorporate into your estate plan.  Some of the people that you named in your will could also have died or moved away.

Forbes’ recent article, “Why You Should Change Your Will Now,” warns us that if you’ve taken the “one and done” approach to your estate plan, think again. In addition to the reasons already mentioned, your assets may have changed dramatically since you signed your will and other estate plan documents. The plan you put in place years ago may not have considered new federal and state estate taxes. Now that you’ve accumulated significant wealth that will be passed on to your children, you might need to review your plans for that wealth for your children.

You may want to include grandchildren to help pay for their college education. It is also not uncommon for parents to want to protect their children from themselves. This can be because of addiction issues or a lack of financial literacy. If that’s an issue, some parents elect to hold monies in trust for adult children, as a way to ensure that the funds will be there throughout the child’s lifetime.

A person’s estate plan should grow with them over time. An estate plan for a twenty-something may be very basic, but a newly-married couple will want to include provisions for their spouse. Parents need to think about providing for and protecting their children. Adult children have another set of concerns and you need to prepare for the possibility of divorcing spouses, poor life choices, addiction issues, and just poor money management. There are many stages in life when you may need to readjust the provisions for your children in your estate planning documents.

If you haven’t looked at your estate plan in a while, do it now.

Reference: Forbes (August 27, 2019) “Why You Should Change Your Will Now”

How Do I Discuss My Parents’ Long-Term Financial Goals With Them?

A recent study by Ameriprise Financial found that more than one-third of adult children say they haven’t had a conversation about their parents’ long-term financial goals. Even though discussing this delicate topic may seem uncomfortable, addressing it now can help avoid challenges and uncertainty in the future. To that end, the Ameriprise Family Wealth Checkup study found that individuals who talk about money matters feel more confident about their financial future.

The Enterprise’s recent article, “Four financial questions to ask your parents,” provides some questions that can help you start the dialogue.

“What do you want to achieve in the next five or 10 years?” Understand your parents’ aspirations for the next few years. This includes their personal and financial goals and when they plan to retire (if they haven’t already). Do they want to move closer to their grandchildren or to warmer weather? Getting an idea of how they want to spend their time will help you know what to expect in the years ahead.

“Where is your financial information located in case of an emergency?” An incident can happen at any time, so it’s essential that you know how to access key personal, financial and estate planning documents. You should have the contact info for their financial adviser, tax professional, and estate planning attorney, and be sure your parents have the right permissions set, so you can step in when the need arises. You should also ask your parents to share the passwords for their primary accounts or let you know where you can find a password list.

“How do you see your legacy?” Talk to your parents about how they want to be remembered and their plans for making that happen. These components can be essential to the discussion:

  • Ask them if they have an updated will or trust, and if there’s anything they’d like to disclose about how the assets will be distributed.
  • Health care choices and expenses are often a big source of stress for retirees. Talk to your parents about their current health priorities and the future and have them formalize their wishes in a health-care directive, which lets them name a loved one to make medical decisions, if they’re unable to do so.

“How can I help?” Proactively offering to help may get rid of some of the frustrations or relieve stress for even the most independent and well-prepared parents. The assistance may be non-financial, like doing house projects or giving them more time with their grandchildren. You should also look into including an attorney in the discussion, in case your parents have estate planning questions.

Retirement and legacy planning can be complex. However, taking the time to have frequent conversations with your parents can help you all prepare for the future.

Reference: The Enterprise (August 19, 2019) “Four financial questions to ask your parents”

What Should I Look for in a Trustee?

Selecting a trustee to manage your estate after you pass away is an important decision. Depending on the type of trust you’re creating, the trustee will be in charge of overseeing your assets and the assets of your family. In general, people choose either a friend or family member or alternatively decide to go with a professional trustee or a trust company or corporate trustee for this critical role.

Forbes’s recent article, “How To Choose A Trustee,” helps you identify what you should look for in a trustee.

If you go with a family member or friend, they should be financially savvy and good with money. You want someone who knows something about investing, and preferably someone who has assets of their own that they are investing with an investment advisor.

A good thing about selecting a friend or family member as trustee is that they’re going to be most familiar with you and your family. They will also understand your family’s dynamics.  Family members also usually don’t charge a trustee fee (although they are entitled to do so).

Depending on your family dynamics and personalities, however, your family may be better off with a professional trustee such as a private fiduciary or trust company that has expertise with trust administration. This may eliminate some potentially hard feelings in the family. Because your family member may be too close to the family and may get caught up in the drama, a neutral third party can also act as a barrier to potential fights and arguments. Certain family members may also end up having a power trip and enjoy having total control of your beneficiary’s finances a bit too much.

Trust companies, especially larger ones, will have more structure and oversight to the trust administration, including a trust department that oversees the administration. This will be more expensive, but it may be money well spent. A trust company can make the tough decisions and tell beneficiaries “no” when needed. It’s common to use a trust company when the beneficiaries don’t get along, when there is a problem beneficiary, or when the trustee is responsible for managing a large sum of money. A drawback is that a trust company may be difficult to remove or become inflexible. They also may be stingy about distributions if it will reduce the assets under management that they’re investing. You can solve this by giving a neutral third party, like a trusted family member, the ability to remove and replace the trustee in your trust documents.

Some people may also choose to have an attorney serve as their trustee. The advantage of a trusted attorney serving as a trustee is that they have familiarity with your family if you’ve worked together for some time. There will, however, be a charge for their time spent serving as trustee.

Talk to your estate planning attorney and go through your concerns to find a trustee solution that works for you and your family.

Reference: Forbes (May 31, 2019) “How To Choose A Trustee” 

Can Liz Hurley’s Son Inherit his Grandfather’s Fortune?

Multi-millionaire Dr. Peter Bing recently tried to stop Damian Hurley, the subject of a previous paternity dispute involving son Steve Bing and Liz Hurley, from inheriting his fortune —because he was born out of wedlock.

However, Wealth Advisor’s recent article, “Liz Hurley’s son Damian wins legal battle against grandfather over inheritance,” says that a Los Angeles judge ruled recently that Damian–fathered by Dr. Bing’s son, Steve–is a rightful beneficiary of the family trust.

Dr. Bing had argued that his son, American businessman Steve Bing, has “never met” Damian and he doesn’t want the child to inherit any of his fortune. Dr. Bing also insisted that, after creating the family trust in 1980, he had stipulated that any grandchild must be “raised by my children as part of their families” to benefit from it.

The elder Bing insisted in recent court papers that the trust “would not benefit any person born out of wedlock unless that person had lived for a substantial period of time as a regular member of the household”. Dr. Bing argued that the definition of the term “grandchild” in the trust was unclear.

However, in court papers, Judge Daniel Juarez wrote: “There is no ambiguity in the trust’s use of the term ‘grandchild’”. Judge Juarez also said, “The trustee’s [Dr. Bing] interpretation of the trusts is unreasonable, and the trustee’s construction of ‘grandchild’ is simply unfounded.”

Damian was born to The Royals actress Elizabeth Hurley in 2002.

Steve Bing is worth roughly $555 million. He initially denied that he was Damian’s father, saying the couple was not in an exclusive relationship at the time. However, a paternity test proved he was the father of the child.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (July 23, 2019) “Liz Hurley’s son Damian wins legal battle against grandfather over inheritance”

Why Is a Revocable Trust So Valuable in Estate Planning?

A revocable trust is sometimes an investment that people are hesitant to make, but they are worth the time and money. There’s quite a bit that a trust can do to solve big estate planning and tax problems for many families.

As Forbes explains in its recent article, “Revocable Trusts: The Swiss Army Knife Of Financial Planning,” trusts are a critical component of a proper estate plan. There are three parties to a trust: the owner of some property (settlor or grantor), who turns it over to a trusted person or organization (trustee) under a trust arrangement to hold and manage for the benefit of someone (the beneficiary). A written trust document will spell out the terms of the arrangement.

One of the most useful trusts is a revocable trust (also known as an inter vivos trust) where the grantor creates a trust, funds it, manages it by themselves, and has unrestricted rights to the trust assets (corpus). The grantor has the right at any point to revoke the trust, by simply tearing up the document and reclaiming the assets, or perhaps modifying the trust to accomplish other estate planning goals.

After discussing trusts with your attorney, they will draft the trust document and re-title property to the trust. The assets transferred to a revocable trust can be reclaimed at any time. The grantor has unrestricted rights to the property. During the life of the grantor, the trust provides protection and management, if and when it’s needed.

Let’s examine the potential lifetime and estate planning benefits that can be incorporated into the trust:

  • Lifetime Benefits. If the grantor is unable or uninterested in managing the trust, the grantor can hire an investment advisor to manage the account in one of the major discount brokerages, or they can appoint a trust company to act for them.
  • Incapacity. A trusted spouse, child, or friend can be named as trustee to care for and represent the needs of the grantor/beneficiary. The trustee will manage the assets during incapacity, without having to declare the grantor incompetent and petitioning for a guardianship or conservatorship. This can be a stressful legal proceeding that makes the grantor a ward of the state. This proceeding can be expensive, public, humiliating, restrictive and burdensome. However, a well-drafted trust (along with powers of attorney) avoids this. If and when the grantor has recovered, they can resume the duties as trustee.
  • Estate Planning. A revocable trust is a great tool for estate planning because it bypasses probate, which can mean considerably less expense, stress and time. When creating your estate plan, make sure to think of more than just the trust. Ask your attorney about how the trust fits in with the rest of your estate plan: a will, powers of attorney, medical directives and other considerations.

Even though a trust is something that most people should consider, not anyone can create one. Your trust should be created by a very competent trust attorney, after a discussion about what you want to accomplish.

Reference: Forbes (February 20, 2019) “Revocable Trusts: The Swiss Army Knife Of Financial Planning”

What Happens When the Family Fights over Personal Items or Artwork?

A few years after her death in 2014, Joan Rivers’ family put hundreds of her personal items up for auction at Christie’s in New York.

As The Financial Times reported in “Why an art collector’s estate needs tight planning,” a silver Tiffany bowl, engraved with her dog’s name, Spike, made headlines when it sold for thirty times its estimated price. This shows how an auction house can generate a buzz around the estate of a late collector, creating demand for items that, had they been sold separately, might have failed to attract as much attention.

A problem for some art and collectible owners is that their heirs may feel much less passionately about the works than the person who collected them. Art collectors should think intentionally about what they want to happen to their collection after they die. A collector can either gift, donate or sell in their lifetime. He or she can also wait until they pass away and then gift, donate, or sell posthumously.

One way a collector can make certain his or her wishes are carried out or eliminate family conflicts after their death is to take the decision out of the hands of the family by placing an art collection in trust. The trust will have the collector’s wishes added into the agreement, and the trustees are appointed from the family and from independent advisers with no interest in a transaction taking place.

Many collectors like to seal their legacy, by making a permanent loan or gift of artworks to a museum. However, their children can renege on these agreements if they’re not adequately protected by trusts or other legal safeguards after a collector’s death.

Even with a trust or other legal structure put in place to preserve a legacy, the key to avoiding a fight over a valuable collection after the death of the collector is to have frank discussions about estate planning with the family well before the reading of the will. This can ensure that their wishes are respected.

Reference: Financial Times (June 20, 2019) “Why an art collector’s estate needs tight planning”